Delaware Corporate Law Update

Updates on Delaware Corporate Law by Evan O. Williford, Esq., Delaware Corporate Litigation Attorney.

Good Things (Sometimes) Come To Those Who Wait: Two Recent Cases Show Pros And Cons To Seeking Books and Records Before Suing

When considering stockholder litigation in Chancery, one of the decisions plaintiffs face is whether to (1) sue immediately or (2) seek books and records under 8 Del. C. § 220 hoping for documents to help survive a motion to dismiss.  This summer, two cases where plaintiffs took the latter route had very different outcomes.

In August, the Court in In re Investors Bancorp, Inc. Stockholder Litigation considered cross motions to appoint lead plaintiffs in a case attacking director compensation as self-interested.  One plaintiff served a books and records request, obtained documents, and filed a complaint twice as long as the other.  While the Court complimented all counsel as “highly competent,” it placed decisive weight on the significant additional information the former uncovered.  For instance, in arguing that the compensation was a self-interested quid pro quo scheme, the latter solely used temporal proximity while the former cited board minutes.  The Court found that the information added by the former counsel was “not fluff;” rather, the former used documents “including board and compensation committee meeting minutes, to provide meaningful, additional factual support for their allegations.”

In June, however, the Court held a complaint filed after litigating a Section 220 action was precluded by the dismissal of another similar complaint two years earlier (Bensoussan).  The Court responded to plaintiff’s argument that the original plaintiff was an inadequate representative by ruling it was reluctant to judge “inadequacy based on the contents of documents obtained in response to a Section 220 demand because that approach ‘encourages hindsight review of conduct’”.  (A plaintiff in such a situation may also contend, whether or not based upon additional books and records, that the claims in the later suit are substantively different from the ones in the prior suit.)  The Court cited two other Delaware cases with similar outcomes.

Thus, as one of the “tools at hand” a books and records demand is a double-edged sword: it may lead to a superior complaint or a precluded one.  In determining whether to make such a demand plaintiffs’ counsel should carefully consider and monitor, among other things: (1) the likelihood of other similar complaints being filed; (2) the likelihood of uncovering evidence that could make the difference on a motion to dismiss (a surviving plaintiff can of course seek merits discovery); and (3) the speed with which the demand will procure helpful documents.  (As the Court in Investors Bancorp noted, a plaintiff faced with a slow demand response can always decide to abandon it and file a merits suit anyway.)

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Filed under: Court of Chancery, Derivative Actions, Preclusion, Section 220 Books and Records

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Delaware Corporate Law Update solely reflect the views of Evan Williford of The Williford Firm, LLP. Its purpose is to provide general information concerning Delaware law; no representation is made about the accuracy of any information contained herein, and it may or may not be updated to reflect subsequent relevant events. This website is not intended to provide legal advice. It does not form any attorney-client relationship and it is not a substitute for one.